10
Jan
2019

Epic Games Store now has a refund policy matching Steam’s

The Epic Games Store has updated its refund policy to one matching the terms of the Steam marketplace, providing for unconditional refunds of games within two weeks of purchase and less than two hours played.

The news came this morning on Twitter from Sergey Galyonkin, Epic’s director of publishing strategy. For pre-ordered games, the return window is until 14 days after the game’s launch date. Both the two-week timeframe and two-hour trial period are features of Valve’s return policy, which it implemented in June 2015.

Galyonkin said Epic is in the process of developing a self-service form for filing and receiving refunds. For now, players who want their money back will have to open a ticket with Epic Games support.

Further down the Twitter thread in which he announced this, Galyonkin said that the Epic Games store will one day add user reviews. However, developers will have to opt-in to having reviews of their products on the storefront. “Plus we want to have a solution against review-bombing,” he added.

The store, which launched in December, now supports a total of 130 countries in 30 different regions for regional pricing, Galyonkin said. The process of adding regional currencies and listing games according to local prices will take some time, according to him; for now, they are being sold in dollars.

The refund change is not related to, but does follow the Better Business Bureau of Eastern North Carolina doling out an F rating for the Fortnitemaker, based on scores of unanswered complaints lodged with the bureau. Most of those complaints involved unauthorized or improper charges, and poor response to customers resolving their accounts.

The BBB said Epic had received 279 total complaints in 2018, 247 of which had gone unanswered. A news release noted that Epic did not respond to the BBB’s request for its side of the story here.

The Epic Games Store is just two months old, but it’s swiftly spinning up as a competitor to Steam, which has dominated the PC digital market for more than a decade. Epic Games started by offering a more favorable rate to developers — 88 percent for them, as opposed to the 70 percent they get on Steam. And earlier this week, Ubisoft announced that March 15’s Tom Clancy’s The Division 2 will launch for Windows PC on UPlay and the Epic Games Store, skipping Steam entirely.

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