13
Feb
2018

Ditch the dice bag and invest in Wyrmwood’s immaculate wooden vault

The market for tabletop gaming gear has heated up over the last few years, and one of the standout manufacturer’s is New England-based Wyrmwood. If that name rings a bell, it’s because the company has exploded into the marketplace with a new line of extravagant gaming tables that are just the thing to fill the void left by the closure of Geek Chic.

While one of Wyrmwood’s handmade tables starts at $5,000, the firm is mostly known for its broad range of smaller products. You may have heard about its dice towers, which raised nearly nearly $250,000 on Kickstarter in 2015. The company’s latest project, however, may be its finest — and most affordable — product yet.

It’s called The Wyrmwood Adventurer’s Arsenal, and it’s already closing in on the quarter-million mark. So what is it?

Wyrmwood - The Adventurer’s Arsenal box, closedWyrmwood - The Adventurer’s Arsenal box, closed
Wyrmwood uses hand-rubbed oils and waxes to finish its products. Of all the sets I’ve seen at Gen Con and PAX, Wyrmwood’s are the most pleasing to the touch.
Charlie Hall/Polygon

At the core of the Arsenal is a dice vault secured by eight neodymium magnets. Inside are three cutouts, each one made to fit a full set of seven polyhedral dice. There’s also a fourth generously proportioned cutout for a miniature, large enough for even 32 mm minis with oversized weapons or exotic poses.

A dice vault isn’t anything new. We’ve written about them before here on Polygon. What makes this one special is the craftsmanship that goes into it. The sample that Wyrmwood provided is perfectly squared, and hand-oiled and waxed. Like all of the company’s products, it’s an absolute pleasure to handle. Also, the interior wells come with two layers of custom-cut foam so that you can adjust them to fit even larger, casino-style or “spindown” dice used for playing Magic: The Gathering.

  • On any other vendor’s products these little branded flourishes would be a bit much. But Wyrmwood’s logos are well-suited to both the Dungeons & Dragons and Pathfinder ethos. On any other vendor’s products these little branded flourishes would be a bit much. But Wyrmwood’s logos are well-suited to both the Dungeons & Dragons and Pathfinder ethos. Charlie Hall/Polygon
  • Charlie Hall/Polygon
  • I thought this was an inlay at first, but it’s actually a very carefully applied brand from a heated brass master. Wyrmwood also does custom engraving. This is a pre-production model, so imperfections in the finish are to be expected. I thought this was an inlay at first, but it’s actually a very carefully applied brand from a heated brass master. Wyrmwood also does custom engraving. This is a pre-production model, so imperfections in the finish are to be expected. Charlie Hall/Polygon
  • The internal vault is just a hair smaller than the rolling tray, so you can easily lift it out with one finger without nicking the finish or gouging a corner. The internal vault is just a hair smaller than the rolling tray, so you can easily lift it out with one finger without nicking the finish or gouging a corner. Charlie Hall/Polygon
  • The finger holes on the left side let you easily open each vault. The finger holes on the left side let you easily open each vault. Charlie Hall/Polygon
  • Charlie Hall/Polygon
  • Charlie Hall/Polygon
  • Apply pressure to the top of the mechanical pencil and the large 3 mm lead falls right out. It requires less pressure to write with than your average mechanical pencil, and erases more easily preventing you from wearing through your character sheets. Apply pressure to the top of the mechanical pencil and the large 3 mm lead falls right out. It requires less pressure to write with than your average mechanical pencil, and erases more easily preventing you from wearing through your character sheets. Charlie Hall/Polygon
  • Charlie Hall/Polygon
  • The crown of the pencil screws off. Inside is a hidden sharpener. Never roleplay with a dull pencil again or, worse yet, a pen. The crown of the pencil screws off. Inside is a hidden sharpener. Never roleplay with a dull pencil again or, worse yet, a pen. Charlie Hall/Polygon
  • The neodymium magnets are screwed into placed. If they ever give up on you let Wyrmwood know. Everything they make comes with a lavish warrantee. The neodymium magnets are screwed into placed. If they ever give up on you let Wyrmwood know. Everything they make comes with a lavish warrantee. Charlie Hall/Polygon
  • The bottom of the rolling tray features rubber feet that are likewise screwed into place. No adhesive “bump-ons” here. The bottom of the rolling tray features rubber feet that are likewise screwed into place. No adhesive “bump-ons” here. Charlie Hall/Polygon

Protecting the vault is a leather-lined rolling tray. It’s made just big enough that you can lift out the vault with only one finger, rather than tipping the whole thing upside down. Binding it all together is a well-appointed leather strap.

I’ve handled just about every single dice vault produced by all of the major boutique manufacturers, and this one is by far the most well-made. Fully assembled, it’s also among the most secure. I don’t have any concern about this thing popping open inside my backpack.

The capstone, however, is the hand-turned mechanical pencil. It uses thick, 3 mm lead and even includes a built-in sharpener.

The four items are being sold à la carte, or bundled together. The set pictured here, made from black walnut, would run you $257 shipped. But the pencil, which would make an excellent gift for any avid RPG player on your list, is only $70. A more modest set, made from red oak, costs $182 shipped, while the pencil alone is $50.

The Kickstarter campaign, which has already met its $10,000 goal, runs until March 7.

Leave a Reply

WP Facebook Auto Publish Powered By : XYZScripts.com