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16
Jul
2018

Adjustable-width bars let mountain bikers change their mind

Ibis' new carbon fiber handlebars come with aluminum inserts that thread onto either end

Wide handlebars are currently popular with mountain bikers, as the extra width offers increased control, easier breathing and better balance. Sometimes, however, riders decide that their bars are too wide, and cut them back – an action that's irreversible once it's been done. Ibis Cycles' new adjustable-width bars offer an alternative.

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Category: Bicycles

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16
Jul
2018

UN and Yale team up to offer big ideas on tiny living

The ELM was created to spark debate on the future of housing and encourage innovation

Yale University's architecture school has collaborated with the United Nations' Environment and Habitat programs, as well as Gray Organschi Architecture, to design a prototype tiny house. Named the Ecological Living Module (ELM), it's an interesting dwelling that produces its own power, water, and food.

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Category: Tiny Houses

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16
Jul
2018

Blood test to detect early-stage melanoma developed

A new blood test could help detect the presence of early-stage melanoma, a common form of ...

Melanoma, the most common type of skin cancer, is traditionally detected via observing changes in irregular moles, and then conducting a skin biopsy for full confirmation. A team from Edith Cowan University in Australia has now developed a blood test that can detect melanoma in its early stages reducing the need for expensive, and frequently unnecessary biopsies.

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Category: Medical

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16
Jul
2018

Hungry plants could learn a thing or two from nitrogen-fixing bacteria

Researchers have engineered bacteria to absorb nitrogen from the air, with the eventual goal of developing ...

Nitrogen is a vital nutrient for plants, and although there's plenty of it drifting around in the air, they can only pull it out of the ground – hence the need for artificial fertilizer. But now, researchers at Washington University in St Louis have engineered bacteria that can efficiently suck nitrogen out of the air, and the long-term goal is to develop crops that can do the same.

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Category: Science

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